Centrifugal Pumps

Loading...

                 

Bachelor Thesis 

Centrifugal Pumps                                                     

by  Christian Allerstorfer    Supervised by  Univ.‐Prof. Dipl.‐Ing. Dr.mont. Franz Kessler   

 

Contents  1) 

Abstract ..................................................................................................................................................... 1 

2) 

Abstract [German] .................................................................................................................................... 1 

3) 

Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 2 

4) 

Definition .................................................................................................................................................. 5 

5) 

The principal of centrifugal pumps ........................................................................................................... 5 

6) 

Pump design .............................................................................................................................................. 6 

7) 

Pump assembly ......................................................................................................................................... 8 

8) 

9) 

ƒ 

Casing ............................................................................................................................................... 8 

ƒ 

Impeller ............................................................................................................................................ 9 

ƒ 

Shaft ................................................................................................................................................ 11 

ƒ 

Bearings .......................................................................................................................................... 11 

ƒ 

Sealing ............................................................................................................................................ 12 

Pump parameters and selection ............................................................................................................. 13  ƒ 

Total dynamic head (TDH) .............................................................................................................. 13 

ƒ 

Flow rate (Q) ................................................................................................................................... 13 

ƒ 

Net positive suction head (NPSH) ................................................................................................... 13 

ƒ 

Specific speed (ns) ........................................................................................................................... 14 

ƒ 

Power and Efficiency (P, η) ............................................................................................................. 15 

ƒ 

Pump characteristic curve .............................................................................................................. 16 

ƒ 

Affinity laws .................................................................................................................................... 17 

ƒ 

System characteristic curve ............................................................................................................ 19 

ƒ 

Pump selection ............................................................................................................................... 20 

ƒ 

Example 1 ....................................................................................................................................... 22 

ƒ 

Example 2 ....................................................................................................................................... 28 

Problems at centrifugal Pumps ............................................................................................................... 31  ƒ 

Cavitation ........................................................................................................................................ 31 

ƒ 

Solids and slurry handling (abrasive medias) ................................................................................. 32 

ƒ 

corrosion ......................................................................................................................................... 33 

10) 

Comparison centrifugal pumps vs. Piston pumps ................................................................................... 33 

11) 

Standards ................................................................................................................................................ 35 

12) 

Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................... 35 

13) 

References .............................................................................................................................................. 36 

 

  Directory I

 

Table of Figures and Equations  Figure 1 – Pump categories ..................................................................................................................................... 2  Figure 3 – Mud Cleaning Unit (NGM Technologies) ................................................................................................ 3  Figure 2 – Mud circulation rotary drilling ............................................................................................................... 3  Figure 5 – Pump station, by Warren pumps in west china (left) and Trans Alaska Pump Station (right) ............... 4  Figure 4 – Trans‐Alaska‐Pipeline topographic map ................................................................................................. 4  Figure 6 – Principle of a centrifugal pump .............................................................................................................. 5  Equation 1 – Bernoulli principle .............................................................................................................................. 6  Figure 7 – Single and double suction pump ............................................................................................................ 6  Figure 8 ‐ Multistage pump (Goulds pumps ‐ model 3600) .................................................................................... 7  Figure 9 – Deep well pump (Goulds pumps ‐ model VIT‐FF) ................................................................................... 7  Figure 10 – horizontal splitted casing of a double suction pump (lower part) ....................................................... 8  Figure 11 – open impeller ....................................................................................................................................... 9  Figure 12 ‐ loss compensation .............................................................................................................................. 10  Figure 13 – enclosed impeller ............................................................................................................................... 10  Figure 14 – pump’s crank shaft ............................................................................................................................. 11  Figure 15 – bearing properties .............................................................................................................................. 11  Figure 16 – mechanical single seal ........................................................................................................................ 12  Equation 2 – total dynamic head .......................................................................................................................... 13  Equation 3 – flow rate ........................................................................................................................................... 13  Equation 4 ‐ NPSH ................................................................................................................................................. 14  Equation 5 – specific speed ................................................................................................................................... 14  Figure 17 – Impeller design over specific speed ................................................................................................... 14  Equation 6 –power ................................................................................................................................................ 15  Equation 7 ‐ efficiency ........................................................................................................................................... 15  Figure 18 ‐ Pump characteristic sheet (Gould pumps – model 3196) ................................................................... 16  Equation 8 – affinity laws (constant impeller diameter) ....................................................................................... 17  Equation 9 – affinity law (constant rotation speed) ............................................................................................. 17  Figure 19 ‐ approximate pump characteristic curve (Goulds pumps – model 3196 at different RPMs) ............... 18  Figure 20 – Examples of hydraulic systems ........................................................................................................... 19  Figure 21 ‐ System characteristic curves ............................................................................................................... 20  Figure 22 – System & Pump Characteristic curve ................................................................................................. 21  Figure 23 ‐ Borehole .............................................................................................................................................. 22  Figure 24 – friction coefficient for OSTWALD fluids .............................................................................................. 23  Figure 25 – pressure loss in manifold systems ...................................................................................................... 25  Figure 26 – Pump selection software, criteria definition ...................................................................................... 26 

 

  Directory II

  Figure 27 – example of results provided by goulds pumps pums selection tool .................................................. 26  Figure 28 ‐ Hydrocyclone, working principle ......................................................................................................... 28  Figure 29 – recommended manifold system ........................................................................................................ 28  Figure 31 – regions of impeller cavitation ............................................................................................................. 31  Figure 30 – bubble collapse .................................................................................................................................. 31  Figure 32 – typical impeller wear due to cavitation .............................................................................................. 32  Figure 33 – piston pump ....................................................................................................................................... 33 

 

  Directory III

 

1) Abstract  Aim of this thesis is to give an overview on centrifugal pumps in general and especially in applications within  the  petroleum  industry.  There  is  a  wide  range  of  pumps  available  but  as  the  radial  pump  is  by  far  the  most  prolific member of the pump family so this paper will concentrate on them. It will first explain the principal of  centrifugal  pumps;  its  types  of  construction,  which  bandwidth  of  pressures  and  flow  rates  are  available  and  how  to  choose  the  right  pump  for  a  specific  application.  Also  some  comparison  with  another  big  family  of  pumps,  the  piston  pumps,  is  made.  Later  chapters  deal  with  typical  problems  when  using  centrifugal  pumps  such as cavitations and corrosion.   Note that this is my first bachelor thesis during my studies of Petroleum Engineering. It is meant as a literature  research to scientifically handle a specific topic and to define the state of the art. All sources are listed at the  end of the document in the chapter references. 

2) Abstract [German]  Ziel  dieser  Arbeit  ist  es  einen  Überblick  über  Zentrifugalpumpen  im  allgemeinem  und  besonders  in  Anwendungen  der  Erdölindustrie  zu  vermitteln.  Für  industriele  Anwendungen  sind  heutzutage  viele  verschiedene  Pumpentypen  verfügbar,  aufgrund  der  weiten  Verbreitung  von  Zentrifugalpumpen  wird  sich  diese Abhandlung auf diese konzentrieren. Zuerst wird auf Aufbau, Prinzip und Konstruktionsvarianten ebenso  wie  auf  verfügbare  Bandbreiten  in  Druck  und  Durchfluss  sowie  Pumpenwahl  eingegangen.  Weiteres  werden  Zentrifugalpumpen  den  Kolbenpumpen  gegenübergestellt.  Spätere  Kapitel  behandeln  typische  Probleme  welche beim Betrieb dieser Pumpen auftreten wie Kavitation und Korrosion.  Man beachte das dies die erste Bakkalaureatsarbeit während meines Petroleum Engineering Studiums ist. Es  wird  als  Literaturrecherche  verstanden  und  dient  dazu  sich  mit  dem  wissenschaftlich  bearbeiten  eines  vorgegebenen  Themas  zu  befassen.  Alle  Quellen  sind  am  Ende  des  Dokuments  im  Kapitel  “References”  angeführt.     

 

  1

 

3) Introduction  A  pump  is  a  machinery  or  device  for  raising,  compressing  or  transferring  fluid.  A  fluid  can  be  gasses  or  any  liquid. Pumps are one of the most often sold and used mechanical devices and can be found in almost every  industry.  Due  to  this  there  is  a  wide  range  of  different  pumps  available.  In  general,  the  family  of  pumps  is  separated into positive displacement and kinetic pumps. A subcategory of kinetic pumps are centrifugal pumps  which are again separated into radial pumps, mixed flow pumps and axial pumps. But even at the axial end of  the  spectrum  there  is  still  a  part  of  the  energy  coming  from  centrifugal  force  unless  most  of  the  energy  is  generated by vane action. On the other hand side in radial pumps almost all the energy comes from centrifugal  force but there is still a part coming from vane action. There are also several pumps combining both principles  placed  somewhere  in  between  the  two  extremes  in  the  centrifugal  pump  spectrum  known  as  mixed  flow  impellers.  Characteristic  for  radial  pumps  are  low  specific  speeds.  As  shown  in  the  diagram  below  there  are  many options in pump design, which will be discussed in detail in later chapters.  

  Figure 1 – Pump categories 

 

 

 

  2

  Within  the  petroleum  industry  pumps  are  necessary  to  process  fluids  especially  hydrocarbons.  Another  important application within the petroleum industry is in the  mud  circuit  on  a  drilling  rig.  On  drilling  rigs,  mud  which  consists  mainly  of  water  and  bentonite  as  well  as  of  several  different  additives  depending  on  many  different  factors  is  used. The heart of the mud circuit is the mud pump which is  in general a high pressure piston pump. It provides the major  part of head to overcome the systems resistance. The mud is  pumped through a piping system to the derrick and through  the  standpipe to  a  certain high. Now  through  the  kelly  hose  via the gooseneck into the upper kelly cock. It flows through  the  kelly  and  the  lower  kelly  cock  into  the  drill  string  down  the  borehole.  At  its  end,  the  mud  leaves  the  drilling  collars  through the drilling bit. The mud pressure is increased by its  1 nozzles and released into the borehole (fig.2 ). The mud cools  the bit and collects the cuttings to transport them up to the  surface where the mud is cleaned. It leaves the borehole and  is  forced  through  the  BOP  Stack  and  the  chock  manifold  system. Now bigger cuttings are removed in the shall shaker  and the mud is collected in the settling pit. It is now pumped  though  a  degasser  to  remove  any  gasses  collected  from  the  borehole  to  avoid  explosions.  After  degassing,  the  sand  is  removed in a desander and the mud is processed to the mud  cleaner.  It  consist  of  several  desilters.  Here  small  cuttings  even smaller than 74µm, are removed. Desander and desilter  Figure 2 – Mud circulation rotary drilling1 are  so  called  hydrocyclones  of  different  sizes,  commonly  charged  by  centrifugal  pumps.  At  the  end  of  the  mud  conditioning  circuit,  a  centrifuge  is  located  to  remove  anything  left.  The  mud  is  now  stored  in  tanks  and  kept  in  motion  by  nozzles  or  agitators.  Finally  the  mud  is  sucked through the hopper to the mud pump by another centrifugal pump. To sum up, centrifugal pumps can  be found on several locations within the mud circuit of a drilling rig like to charging degasser, desander, mud  cleaner as well as the mud pump. On rigs centrifugal pumps can also be found as fuel or cooling water pumps  for e.g. diesel engines 

 

Figure 3 – Mud Cleaning Unit (NGM Technologies) 2 

                                                                  1  www.q8geologist.com (modified)  2  Neftegazmash‐Technologies (modified)   

  3

  Other  typical  applications  for  centrifugal  pumps  are  pipeline  applications.  Pipelines  are  used  for  economical  transport of hydrocarbons like oil and gas over long distances. At the beginning of a pipeline system, in most  cases  huge  storage  tanks  can  be  found  to  ensure  a  continuous  flow  through  the  pipeline.  The  oil  is  forced  through  the  pipe  by  a  few  powerful  centrifugal  pumps  in  serial.  On  its  long  way,  pumping  stations are required to overcome the resistance  and  heights.  These  pumping  stations  are  distributed  over  the  whole  length  of  the  pipeline,  but  can  be  found  especially  before  mountains.  As  an  example,  the  1280km  long  Trans‐Alaska  pipeline  has  11  pumping  stations  with 4 pumps each. Usually only 7 stations are in  operation  and  provide  the  head  to  overcome  height  differences  and  the  fluid  –  pipe  friction.  The  other  4  pump  stations  are  on  standby  and  are  activated  if  necessary  to  ensure  sufficient  head at peak loads. The pipeline has a maximum  capacity  of  around  330.000m³  per  day.  So  it  is  obviously that pipelines are a perfect application  of  high  capacity  pumps  like  centrifugal  pumps.  There are also several valves to control the flow  or to shut in the pipeline in case of an accident  1 along it. On the map (fig.4 ) it can be easily seen  that  the  pump  stations  are  not  distributed  Figure 4 – Trans‐Alaska‐Pipeline topographic map1 regularly  over  the  pipeline’s  length.  At  the  end  of a pipeline, usually a distributing station like a  major  harbour  or  refineries  can  be  found. In  case  of  the  Trans‐Alaska  Pipeline,  it  is  the  harbour  in Valdez  to  distribute the oil from the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field to up to four tankers simultaneously. 

 

Figure 5 – Pump station, by Warren pumps in west china (left) and Trans Alaska Pump Station (right) 2 

These are just examples for the wide range of applications of centrifugal pumps within the petroleum industry.  Also important are applications within the hydrocarbon processing industry and on offshore rigs or distributing  stations at harbours.     

                                                                  1  www.Nationalatlas.gov (modified)  2  Warren Pumps (left), Howard C. Anderson (right)   

  4

 

4) Definition  Symbol 

Unit 

Symbol 

Unit 





Impeller diameter 

kg/m³

density 

height (pos. upwards from PCL) pressure suction flange

ρ η Q

z  ps 

m  bar 

‐ m³/s

efficiency  flow rate 

p d 

bar 

pressure discharge flange

pv

bar

vaporize pressure 

pe   g 

bar  m/s² 

pressure environment (1bar) acceleration of gravity (9,81m/s²)

P NPSHA

W m

electric power  NPSH ‐ available 



m/s 

velocity 

NPSHR

m

NPSH ‐ required 

H

m

Head

1/min  n  Shortcut  TDH  NPSH  BEP  PCL  index: 1,2 

Definition 

rotation per minute 

Definition 

Description total dynamic head  net positive suction head best efficiency point  pump centre line  suction side, discharge side

5) The principal of centrifugal pumps  A centrifugal pump is a rotodynamic pump that uses a rotating impeller to increase the pressure of a fluid. The  fluid  enters  the  pump  near  the  rotating  axis,  streaming  into  the  rotating  impeller.  The  impeller  consists  of  a  rotating  disc  with  several  vanes  attached.  The  vanes  normally  slope  backwards,  away  from  the  direction  of  rotation. When the fluid enters the impeller at a certain velocity due to the suction system, it is captured by the  rotating  impeller  vanes.  The  fluid  is  accelerated  by  pulse  transmission  while  following  the  curvature  of  the  impeller vanes from the impeller centre (eye) outwards. It reaches its maximum velocity at the impeller’s outer  diameter and leaves the impeller into a diffuser or volute chamber (fig.6). 

 

Figure 6 – Principle of a centrifugal pump 1 

 

 

                                                                  1  ITT – Goulds Pumps (modified)   

  5

  So the centrifugal force assists accelerating the fluid particles because the radius at which the particles enter is  smaller than the radius at which the individual particles leave the impeller. Now the fluid’s energy is converted  into  static  pressure,  assisted  by  the  shape  of  the  diffuser  or  volute  chamber.  The  process  of  energy  conversation in fluids mechanics follows the Bernoulli principle (eqn.1) which states that the sum of all forms of  energy along a streamline is the same on two points of the path. The total head energy in a pump system is the  sum of potential head energy, static pressure head energy and velocity head energy.  

v12 p1 v22 p z1 + + = z2 + + 2 2⋅ g ρ ⋅ g 2⋅ g ρ ⋅ g   Equation 1 – Bernoulli principle 

As a centrifugal pump increases the velocity of the fluid, it is essentially a velocity machine. After the fluid has  left the impeller, it flows at a higher velocity from a small area into a region of increasing area. So the velocity is  decreasing  and  so  the  pressure  increases  as  described  by  Bernoulli’s  principle.  This  results  in  an  increased  pressure at the discharge side of the pump. As fluid is displaced at the discharge side of the pump, more fluid is  sucked in to replace it at the suction side, causing flow. 

6) Pump design  Back  in  1475,  the  Italian  Renaissance  engineer  Francesco  di  Giorgio  Martini  describes  a  water  or  mud  lifting  machine in one of his treatises that can be characterised as the first prototype of a centrifugal pump. The first  true centrifugal pump was invented by the French physician Denis Papin in 1689, when he was experimenting  with  straight  vane  impellers.  British  inventor  John  Appold  introduced  the  first  curved  vane  impeller  in  1851.  Nowadays  only  curved  impellers  are  used  in  3  different  types.  There  are  pumps  with  open,  semi‐open  and  enclosed  impellers.  Open  impellers  only  consist  of  blades  attached  to  its  eye  as  semi‐open  ones  are  constructed with a disc attached to one side of the vanes. Enclosed impellers have discs attached to both sides  of the vanes. Impellers are also classified based on the number of points where the fluid can enter the pump.  There are single suction, which allow the fluid to enter its centre from only one side, as well as double suction  impellers which can be entered by fluid from both sides simultaneously. These types of construction are also  known as overhung impeller pumps and impeller between bearings pumps. 

 

Figure 7 – Single and double suction pump 1 

                                                                      1  ITT – Goulds Pumps   

  6

  Another option in centrifugal pump design is single stage and multistage design (fig.9). Single stage pump is the  standard centrifugal pump design, equipped with only a single impeller. Multistage pumps on the other hand  consist of two or more impellers fitted to the same shaft in a single casing. Multistage pumps work like two or  more pumps operating in serial. Therefore multistage pumps are most suitable in low flow rate and high TDH  applications.  

  Figure 8 ‐ Multistage pump (Goulds pumps ‐ model 3600)1 

  Centrifugal  pumps  can  also  be  separated  into  horizontal  pump  design and vertical pump design (fig.8). Vertical centrifugal pumps  are especially used as submerged or in well pumps. Another point  when talking about centrifugal pumps is priming. Every centrifugal  pump has to be primed as it is not able to suck any fluid as long as  the impeller is filled with air. This is because air is approximately  1000 times lighter than for example water. So to suck water into  the pump to prime itself, for every meter it would have to be able  to  produce  a  TDH  of  1000m.Due  to  the  fact  that  conventional  centrifugal pumps are not able to produce a TDH in that order of  magnitude, most centrifugal pumps have to be primed either with  an extra device, for example a vacuum pump or a special design of  the  pump  casing.  Due  to  the  wide  range  of  design  variations  where most of them are combinable in many different ways there  is  a  huge  range  of  centrifugal  pumps  available  beginning  with  standard single suction, single stage, non self priming pumps up to  double  suction  high  flow  rate,  multistage  pumps  for  high  pressures or self priming pumps for special applications. 

                                                                  1  ITT – Goulds Pumps   

 

Figure 9 – Deep well pump (Goulds pumps ‐  model VIT‐FF)1 

  7

 

7) Pump assembly  In this chapter, the main parts, a centrifugal pump consist of are discussed. These are the casing, the impeller,  shaft, bearings and seals. 

ƒ Casing 

 

The pump’s casing (fig.9 1 ) houses the hole assembly and protects is from harm as well as forces the  fluid  to  discharge  from  the  pump  and  convert  velocity  into  pressure.  The  casings  design  does  not  influence TDH but is important to reduce friction losses. It supports the shaft bearings and takes the  centrifugal forces of the rotating impeller and axial loads caused by pressure thrust imbalance. Most of  all centrifugal pumps are of simple spiral casing and are not equipped with a guide vane aperture. Even  if  this  would  increase  efficiency  due  to  the  simplicity  of  spiral  casings,  this  is  the  preferred  type  of  construction.  Only  extraordinary big or multistage pumps do have guide vanes. The  spiral  pump  casing  has  to  be  carefully  designed  to  avoid  turbulences  resulting  in  a  decrease  in  efficiency.  The  shape  of  the  casing  is  defined  by  several  factors;  these  are  profiles  angles,  diameter  and  width.  The  whole  amount  of  fluid  flows  through  the  discharge  cross  section,  the  amount  of  fluid  is  decreasing  when  going  backwards  in  the  spiral,  from  point  of  view  of  flow  direction.  Therefore  the  area  of  the  profiles  is  Figure 10 – horizontal splitted casing  of a double suction pump (lower  decreasing continuously as well, to fit the flow rate in the specific  part)1  point of the pump casing. The result is a spiral shaped casing. The  optimum properties of the spiral were found in experiments and expressed in formulas and diagrams.  The  fluid  velocity  is  not  constantly  distributed  over  a  certain  profile  section.  Modern  Pumps  are  designed for a constant pressure and constant mean velocity in every profile section at the BEP. Apart  from the BEP, the radial forces are out of balance resulting in a total radial force different to zero. This  is important because the radial force bends the pump’s shaft and results in higher wear at seals and  could lead to shaft fatigue. To reduce most radial forces the pump casing can be designed as a double  spiral casing. In this case the flow is spitted into two parts. Due to symmetry reasons almost all radial  forces chancel each other out. Another important part of the pump’s casing are elbows in multistage  pumps to deflect the flow from the previous stages discharge side to the suction side of the following.  If a multistage pump is equipped with guide vanes, no elbows are necessary. As already mentioned,  guide vane construction is only common at big or horizontal multistage pumps. Guide vanes work as a  diffuser  and  convert  the  increased  fluid  velocity  into  pressure.  It  consists  of  extending  channels  arranged around the impeller. To ensure adequate pump life time, the pump’s casing material should  be selected carefully. Standard pump casings are made of cast iron but due to the fact that cast iron is  not  that  resistant  against  cavitation,  many  pumps  are  coated  or  made  from  more  wear  resistant  materials.  Due  to  vibrations  the  casing  should  have  good  damping  properties.  Pump  casings  are  splitted either axial or radial to allow assembling and maintenance.    

                                                                  1  www.rumfordgroup.com   

  8

  ƒ Impeller  The impeller is the essential part of a centrifugal pump. The performance of the pump depends on the  impeller diameters and design. The pump’s TDH is basically defined by the impeller’s inner and outer  diameter and the pump’s capacity is defined by the width of the impeller vanes. In general, there are  three possible types of impellers, open, enclosed and semi open impellers, each suitable for a specific  application.  Standard  impellers  are  made  of  cast  iron  or  carbon  steel,  while  impeller  for  aggressive  fluids and slurries require high end materials to ensure a long pump life. 

o Open impeller  Open  impellers  (fig.9 1 )  are  the  simplest  type  of  impellers. They consist of blades attached to the hub.  This  type  of  impeller  is  lighter  than  any  of  the  other  type at the same diameter. Weight reduction leads to  less force applied to the shaft and allows smaller shaft  diameters.  These  results  in  lower  costs  compared  to  equivalent  shrouded  impellers.  Typically,  open  impellers operate at higher efficiency because there is  no friction between the shrouds and the pump casing.  Figure 11 – open impeller1 On  the  other  hand  side,  open  impellers  have  to  be  carefully positioned in the casing. The gap between the impeller and the surrounding casing should be  as small as possible to maximise efficiency. As the impeller wears the clearance between the impeller  and the front and back walls open up, what leads to a dramatic drop in efficiency. A big problem when  using  a  pump  with  an  open  impeller  are  abrasives.  Due  to  the  minimized  clearance  between  blades  and  casing,  high  velocity  fluids  in  close  proximity  to  the  stationary  casing  establish  vortices  that  increase wear dramatically. 

o Semi­open impeller  Semi‐open impellers can be seen as a compromise between open and enclosed impellers. A semi‐open  impeller  is  constructed  with  only  one  shroud,  usually  located  at  the  back  of  the  impeller.  It  usually  operates at a higher efficiency than an equivalent enclosed one due to reduced disc friction as there is  only one shroud. A big advantage of semi‐open impellers compared to open ones is that the impellers  axial position can be adjusted to compensate for wear. A problem is that the entire backside of the  impellers shroud is under full impeller discharge pressure as the front side is under suction pressure  increasing along the impeller radius due to centrifugal force. The differential between these pressures  causes an axial thrust imbalance. Manufactures try to reduce this effect by applying vanes to the back  side of the impeller. But the efficiency of these so called “pump out vanes” decreases if the impeller is  moved forward to compensate for wears. A better option to compensate the loss of efficiency is an  adjustable wear plate, so that clearance adjustments can be made. Semi‐open impellers are also easily  to manufacture as all sides of the impeller are easy accessible for manufacturing processes as well as  for  applying  surface  hardening  treatments.  In  combination  with  wear  compensation  applications,  semi‐open  impellers  can  be  used  for  intermediate  abrasive  fluids.  Another  advantage  if  using  semi  closed impellers in combination with an adjustable wear plate compared to an open impeller equipped  with the same wear compensation system is vane support. This prevents the vanes from collapsing or  deformation  when  using  it  with  fluids  contaminated  by  solids.  This  justifies  the  application  of  semi‐ open impellers even thought it seems logically to use an open impeller due to its reduced weight.     

                                                                  1  Hwww.mcnallyinstitute.com (left), ITT – Goulds Pumps (right)   

  9

  o Enclosed impeller  Enclosed  impellers  (fig.12 1 )  consist  of  blades  covered  by  a  front  and  back  shroud.  The  fluid  steams  through  the  impeller  without  interacting  with  the  stationary  pump casing. In a well designed enclosed impeller, the  relative  velocity  between  the  fluid  and  the  impeller  walls  at  any  given  radius  is  rather  small.  The  disc  friction of the shrouds rotating in close proximity to the  pump  casing  causes  a  lower  efficiency  as  comparable  semi‐open or open impellers. A problem when dealing  Figure 13 – enclosed impeller1 with enclosed impellers is leakage between the impeller  shrouds and the pump casing back to the suction side of the pump. There are two common ways for  controlling  leakage  in  enclosed  impeller  pumps  (fig.13 2 ).  One  are  wear rings in combination with impeller balance holes. But the tight  clearance between the rotating and the stationary wear ring causes  high  fluid  velocities  and  therefore  a  high  wear  rate.  Wear  ring  lifespan  is  unacceptable  short  in  an  abrasive  environment.  If  wear  rings reach the end of their intended lifespan, it has to be replaced  because  if  it  is  not  the  high  velocity  zone  can  shift  from  the  wear  ring  into  the  impeller  thrust  balance  holes.  This  could  cause  significant  damage  to  the  impeller  and  may  result  in  an  expensive  repair or replacement of the impeller. So this is only an option when  dealing  with  moderate  abrasive  fluids  with  light  solids  only.  The  other possibility to control wear and axial thrust balance are pump‐ out vanes. These pump‐out vanes cause much lower local velocities  spread  over  a  bigger  area  resulting  in  lower  wear.  It  is  not  uncommon,  that  pump‐out  vane  lifespan  equals  or  exceeds  the  main impeller’s lifespan. The major disadvantage of pump out vanes  is their power consumption what leads to a lower efficiency. Overall  pump‐out  vanes  provide  a  good  pump  characteristic  when  dealing  with abrasive solids. Another problem when operating an enclosed  impeller in combination with fluids contaminated by large solids like  rocks is that it may happen that a piece of solid gets caught in the  impeller  eye  outlet.  This  may  cause  a  mechanical  or  hydraulically  imbalance and has the potential to damage the pump. In an open or  semi‐open  impeller  this  rock  would  be  broken  by  the  grinding  Figure 12 ‐ loss compensation2 between the rotating impeller and the stationary casing. To remove the blockage disassembling of the  pump would be necessary.   

 

                                                                  1  http://knowledgepublications.com (left), www.engineersedge.com (right)  2  Lawrence Pumps Inc., RunTimes jan.05 issue (modified)   

  10

  ƒ Shaft  The shaft is the connection between impeller and drive unit which is in most cases an electric motor  but  can  also  be  a  gas  turbine.  It  is  mainly  charged  by  a  radial  force  caused  by  unbalanced  pressure  forces in the spiral casing and an axial force due to the pressure difference between front and backside  of  the  impeller.  Most  common  pump  shafts  are  made  of  carbon  steel.  There  are  several  cranks  to  support the bearings and seals. A high surface quality and small clearances are required. Especially in  the areas of the bearing’s, clearance and surface quality is important to ensure right positioning of the  shaft in the casing and therefore close positioning clearances of the impeller. At the area of the seals,  particularly the surface quality is important to ensure an adequate seal lifespan. In shaft design it is  also important to avoid small radiuses at cranks to minimize stress in these areas which are susceptible  for fatigue.  

 

Figure 14 – pump’s crank shaft 1 

ƒ Bearings  The  bearings  keep  the  shaft  in  place  to  ensure  radial  and  axial clearance. Some approximate bearing properties can be  seen in fig.14 2 . The bearings lead radial and axial forces from  the  impeller  into  the  casing.  In  double  suction  pumps  bearings are located at both sides of the impeller as at single  suction pumps all bearings are located behind the impeller.  In  horizontal  process  pumps,  usually  oil  bath  lubricated  bearings  are  used.  Medium  and  heavy  duty  process  pumps  are used in refineries, where highest reliability is required. In  these  pumps  axial  loads  are  supported  by  universal  single  row  angular  contact  ball  bearings.  In  heavy  duty  process  pumps,  also  matched  taper  roller  bearings  with  steep  contact  angles,  arranged  face  to  face  or  back  to  back  are  used to support combinations of high radial and axial loads.  In  very  high  duty  service  and  slurry  pumps,  spherical  roller  bearings  can  be  used  to  support  very  high  radial  loads.  A  spherical  thrust  bearing  is  used  to  support  axial  loads.  It  is  usually  spring  preloaded  to  ensure  that  sufficient  load  is  applied  during  start  up  or  pump  shutdown.  At  vertical  pumps,  the  thrust  bearing  can  be  a  ball  bearing  with  a  spherical  outer  ring  raceway,  with  the  centre  of  the  radius  located  on  the  bearing  axis,  providing  a  self‐alignment                                                                    1  ITT – Goulds pumps (modified)  2  Pump User’s Handbook (by Heinz P. Bloch, Allan R. Budris)   

Figure 15 – bearing properties2

  11

  capability. It is equipped with a 45° contact angle that enables the bearing to support large axial loads  and moderate radial loads. If the pump is operated at its BEP, the bearing will only have to carry the  rotating  assemblies’  weight,  the  stress  due  to  interference  fit  of  the  shaft  and  in  some  cases  manufacturer  dependent  preloads.  Unfortunately,  many  bearings  are  overloaded  because  of  wrong  interference  fit,  shaft  bend,  solids,  unbalanced  rotating  elements,  vibrations,  axial  thrust  and  many  more. This leads to increased stress and temperature and therefore to a decrease in lifespan. It is also  important for the bearing’s lifespan to protect it from fluid by adequate seals. 

ƒ Sealing  To protect the bearings against fluid and prevent leakage, there are several seals fitted into the casing.  Nowadays, rotary pumps are equipped with mechanical seals (fig.14 1 ). A mechanical seal consists of  primary and secondary sealing. In most cases the primary part, which is fitted to the casing, is made of  a hard material like silicon carbide or tungsten carbide. The other, the rotating part of the primary seal  is made of a soft material like carbon. Both parts are pressed against each other by e.g. a spring. The  secondary sealings are not rotating relative to each other and provide a fluid barrier. Mechanical seals  can be separated into pusher/non‐pusher seals, seal driving/spring compression, balanced/unbalanced  and  inside/outside  mounting.  Pusher seals will have a tendency to  “hang  up”  when  handling  fluids  which  crystallize  because  the  secondary  seal  member  is  not  able  to  accommodate  for  travel.  Whether  applying  a  balanced  or  unbalanced  seal  will  effect  seal  performance. Unbalanced seals see  a high pressure at the impeller side  and  therefore  have  a  reduced  fluid  film  between  the  seal  faces.  This  leads  to  overheating,  rapid  face  wear  and  seal  fatigue  at  early  stages.  To  simplify  maintenance  many  seals  are  available  in  Figure 16 – mechanical single seal1  cartridges  which  are  pre‐packed  seal  assemblies.  To  avoid  any  leakage  when  handling  hazard  fluids,  double  or  tandem  seals  can  be  applied.  In  these  seals,  a  secondary  so  called  containment  seal  is  placed  after  the  primary  one.  The  space  in  between  is  filled  with  a  natural  fluid  called  barrier  or  buffer  fluid.  These  seals  are  very  common in the petroleum industry. The difference between a tandem and a double seal is that in a  double seal the barrier fluid is pressurised. Due to this, in case of primary seal fatigue the pressurised  barrier  fluid  streams  into  the  pumps  instead  of  the  hazard  fluid  into  the  atmosphere.  The  seal  materials must fit the fluid to ensure accurate seal lifespan. The standards of modern mechanical seals  are widely defined by API Standard 682 ‐ Shaft Sealing Systems for Centrifugal and Rotary Pumps.     

 

                                                                  1  US patent 2951719   

  12

 

8) Pump parameters and selection  There are several parameters depending on impeller design, diameter, RPM etc., characterising a pump. In this  chapter  the  most  important  pump  parameters  will  be  discussed  as  well  as  an  example  showing  how  to  calculate losses in a system and to select a pump. 

ƒ Total dynamic head (TDH)  Head in general is used to define energy supplied to a liquid by a pump and is expressed in units of  length. In absence of any velocity it is equal to the height of a static column of fluid that is supported  by a pressure in the point of datum. Total dynamic head (TDH) is the difference between total dynamic  discharge  head  and  total  dynamic  suction  head  (eqn.2).  Total  dynamic  discharge  (suction)  head  is  practically the pressure read from a gauge at the discharge (suction) flange converted to length units  and corrected to the pump centre line plus the velocity head at the point of the gauge (eqn.2). These  two values represent the total amount of energy of the fluid at the discharge and suction flange of the  pump.  Mathematically  it  is  the  sum  of  static  discharge  (suction)  head  and  velocity  at  the  discharge  (suction) flange minus total friction head in the discharge (suction) line. The difference of these values  gives  you  the  THD  which  represents  the  energy  added  to  the  fluid.  TDH  does  not  depend  on  the  delivered fluids density. A higher density only increases the pressure and therefore the required power  at a constant flow rate. 

TDH=h d -h s TDH=(z 2 -z1 )+

(p 2 -p1 ) (v 22 -v12 )   + ρ×g 2×g

Equation 2 – total dynamic head 

ƒ Flow rate (Q)  (Volumetric) Flow rate is the volume of fluid passing through the pump per unit of time. It is calculated  as  area  times  fluid  velocity  (eqn.3).  It  depends  on  the  impeller  geometry  and  RPM.  Impellers  are  optimised for highest outlet velocities. Multiplied by the useable impeller inlet area you will get the  flow  rate.  An  impeller  is  designed  for  a  maximised  flow  rate  at  a  specific  speed  depending  on  its  diameter. This is called the point of best efficiency.  

Q=A1 ⋅ v1 =A 2 ⋅ v 2   Equation 3 – flow rate 

ƒ Net positive suction head (NPSH)  NPSH  is  defined  as  total  suction  head  above  the  suction  nozzle  and  corrected  to  datum,  less  the  vapour pressure of the fluid converted into length units. It analyses energy condition on the suction  side  of  the  pump  to  determine  whether  the  liquid  will  vaporise  at  the  lowest  pressure  point  of  the  pump.  Vapour  pressure  is  a  characteristic  fluid  property  increasing  with  increasing  temperature.  It  indicates the pressure at which a fluid starts boiling, causing bubbles which move along the impeller  surface to an area of higher pressure were they collapse rapidly and cause significant harm to it. By  decreasing the pressure the temperature at which this happens also decreases. So if the pressure is  low enough it is possible to see this effect even at surrounding temperature. This effect is known as  cavitations and should necessarily be avoided. It is obvious that in order to pump a fluid in an effective  way we have to keep it liquid. Therefore NPSH required (NPSH R) is the total suction head required to  prevent  the  fluid  from  vaporising  at  the  lowest  pressure  point  of  the  pump.  NPSHR  is  a  function  of   

  13

  pump  design  as  the  pressure  at  the  impeller  decreases  by  accelerating  the  fluid  along  the  impeller.  There  are  also  pressure  losses  due  to  shock  and  turbulences  as  the  fluid  strikes  the  impeller.  To  overcome all these pressure drops in the pump and maintain the fluid above vapour pressure a certain  positive suction head is required. NPSHR varies with flow rate and speed within any particular pump.  The available NPSH is a function of the system in which the pump operates. To avoid cavitations NPSHA  must be bigger than NPSHR. In practise the NPSHA can be determined by a gauge on the suction flange  of the pump and the following formula (eqn.4). It is also common to add a certain safety value to the  NPSHR to make sure that there is enough suction head to prevent the fluid from vaporising. In practice  a safety value of 0,5m has turned out to be reasonable. 

⎛ v12 ⋅ ρ ⎞ p +p + ⎜ 1 e ⎟ -p v 2 ⎠ ⎝ NPSH A = +Δz1,2 ρ⋅g  

NPSH A ³NPSH R +0,5m Equation 4 ‐ NPSH 

ƒ Specific speed (ns)  Specific  speed  (eqn.5)  is  a  value  to  characterise  the  shape  of  a  impeller.  Low  specific  speed  characterises a radial impeller and is increasing up to high specific speed at axial impellers. Impellers in  between  are  known  as  Francis‐vane  and  mixed‐flow  impeller  (fig.11).  Specific  speed  is  only  of  designing engineering significance used to predict pump characteristics.  

n s =n ⋅

Q BEP TDH

3 4 BEP

 

Equation 5 – specific speed 

 

Figure 17 – Impeller design over specific speed 1 

 

 

                                                                  1  www.lightmypump.com (modified)   

  14

  ƒ Power and Efficiency (P, η)  The  work  performed  by  a  pump  is  a  function  of  THD,  flow  rate  and  the  specific  gravity  of  the  fluid.  Pump  input  (P)  or  brake  horse  power  (bhp)  is  the  actual  power  delivered  to  the  pump  shaft.  Pump  output (Phydr) or hydraulic horse power (whp) is the energy delivered to the fluid per time unit (eqn.6).  Due to mechanical and hydraulic losses in the pump, Phydr is always smaller than P. Therefore efficiency  is defined as Phydr divided by P (eqn.7). The impeller geometry is optimized to provide highest flow rate  at a certain speed at a given diameter at its point of best efficiency (BEP). If operating a pump off its  (BEP), losses due to increasing turbulences and recirculation will increase and reduce efficiency. These  effects  are  caused  by  a  mismatch  of  the  pump’s  design  flow  rate  and  the  actual  flow  rate.  The  difference between inlet vane angle and approaching flow angle is increasing as moving away from the  BEP as well as losses between impeller vane exit and the diffuser. Result of this is an increased flow  between the impellers shrouds and the casing.  

Phydr =ρ ⋅ g ⋅ Q ⋅ TDH   Equation 6 –power 

η=

Phydr P

=

ρ ⋅ g ⋅ Q ⋅ TDH   P

Equation 7 ‐ efficiency 

 

 

 

  15

  ƒ Pump characteristic curve  The  pump  characteristic  curve  shows  the  performance  of  a  pump.  It  usually  shows  TDH,  power,  efficiency  and  NPSHR  plotted  over  flow  rate  at  a  given  RPM.  There  are  absolute  or  dimensional  and  relative or non‐dimensional plots (fig.12). The difference is that a dimensional diagram shows absolute  values, while a non‐dimensional plot shows the data in percent of their values at the pumps BEP. The  first  line  in  the  diagram  shows  the  pumps  THD  plotted  over  flow  rate.  Characteristic  is  the  slightly  decreasing THD at increasing flow rate. The efficiency graph is typically increasing until it reaches its  peak  at  the  pumps  BEP  and  drops  as  flow  rate  is  further  increasing.  The  bhp  line  is  more  or  less  a  straight  line  as  it  increases  with  increasing  flow  rate.  It  is  also  possible  to  plot  these  functions  for  several speeds at a given diameter or at different diameters for a given speed in one diagram. Result is  a  set  of  pump  characteristic  curves  as  provided  by  most  manufactures.  In  these  diagrams  you  can  estimate  pump  behaviour  at  constant  speeds  and  a  range  of  impeller  diameters.  Constant  horse  power, efficiency, and NPSHR lines are plotted over the various head curves. The pump characteristic  curve shown in fig.12 is an example for the what information you can get out of such a diagram. In this  example, we assume that we have this pump with an impeller diameter of 7” operating at 3540RPM  and  a  flow  rate  of  48m³/h.  Therefore  we  can  read  from  the  diagram  the  pump’s  current  efficiency,  head, required power as well as the NPSHR. In this case, our operating point is almost the pump’s BEP  and we get THD of 60m, an efficiency of about 61%, required power of 13Hp and a NPSHR of 9ft. 

 

Figure 18 ‐ Pump characteristic sheet (Gould pumps – model 3196) 1 

 

 

                                                                  1  ITT – Goulds Pumps (modified)   

  16

  ƒ Affinity laws  These  laws  express  relationships  between  several  variables  involved  in  pump  performance  such  as  flow  rate,  impeller  diameter,  head  and  power.  There  are  two  ways  to  express  these  relationships:  either holding the impeller diameter (eqn.8) or the rotation speed (eqn.9) constant. Affinity laws apply  to radial pumps as well as axial pumps.  

Q1 n1 = Q2 n 2

TDH1 ⎛ n1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ TDH 2 ⎝ n 2 ⎠

2

3

P1 ⎛ n1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ P2 ⎝ n 2 ⎠  

Equation 8 – affinity laws (constant impeller diameter) 

 

Q1 D1 = Q2 D2

TDH1 ⎛ D1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ TDH 2 ⎝ D 2 ⎠

2

3

P1 ⎛ D1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ P2 ⎝ D 2 ⎠  

Equation 9 – affinity law (constant rotation speed) 

As an example, assume operating a pump at BEP at n1, we can calculate the BEP for any other n2 (or  any  other  diameter).  The  efficiency  remains  almost  constant  at  speed  and  small  impeller  diameter  changes.  At  first;  we  have  to  determine  flow  rate,  TDH  and  power  for  the  pumps  BEP  at  3540RPM  from the pump characteristic curve (fig.12). With this knowledge; it is possible to calculate the BEP for  4000RPM and plot a new pump characteristic curve. 

Q1 n1 = Q2 n 2



Q 2 =42,9

m3 h

2

TDH1 ⎛ n1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ → TDH 2 ⎝ n 2 ⎠ P1 ⎛ n1 ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ P2 ⎝ n 2 ⎠    

 

TDH 2 =76,6m

3



P2 =18,75Hp  

 

  17

  By  performing  this  calculation  for  several  points;  we  get  the  pump  characteristic  curve  for  the  new  speed (fig.13). 

  Figure 19 ‐ approximate pump characteristic curve (Goulds pumps – model 3196 at different RPMs) 

This  shows  that  with  a  change  in  speed  or  in  impeller  diameter;  the  pumps  characteristic  can  be  optimized to fit the system it is operated in.   

 

  18

  ƒ System characteristic curve  A system characteristic curve represents the behaviour of the system in which the pump is operated. It  defines the point on the pump characteristic curve on which the pump operates. Plotting the system  and pump characteristic curve in the same diagram, the point of intersection is the operation point of  the pump, operated at a certain speed in a given system. It is also possible to predict the behaviour of  the pump during a change either in system or pump properties.  

 

Figure 20 – Examples of hydraulic systems 1 

 

System  A  is  a  typical  piping  system  with  a  centrifugal  pump  to  deliver  fluid  to  a  higher  tank.  The  difference in system B is that in this case almost all the piping is vertical. This is important because the  main losses are caused by friction between the fluid and the pipe’s inner surface. Therefore, losses in  system  B  are  smaller  than  in  system  A.  The  system  characteristic  curves  corresponding  to  the  examples (fig 14) are shown below (fig.10). Due to this dependence of friction from velocity, the blue  curve, representing system B, is much flatter than the characteristic curve of system A. The red line  shows the energy that is required (TDH) to pump the fluid from the lower to the upper tank which are  both  under  ambient  pressure.  The  system  characteristic  curve  is  of  parabolic  shape  because  it  is  plotted  over  flow  rate  and  friction  is  function  of  squared  velocity.  So  if  flow  rate  is  increasing,  also  velocity  is  increasing  the  same  way  and  losses  due  to  friction  increase.  Therefore,  more  energy  is  required to compensate losses and deliver fluid to the upper tank. Obviously, a throttled valve causes  additional resistance and therefore additional losses resulting in more energy required to deliver fluid  to the upper tank at the same flow rate or a lower flow rate at constant power.   

                                                                  1  Reinhütte Pumpen (modified)   

  19

 

Figure 21 ‐ System characteristic curves

ƒ Pump selection  First of all, and this is properly the most important part, we have to take a close look at the application  of  the  pump.  There  should  be  as  much  details  about  the  system  available  as  possible,  to  ensure  choosing  the  right  pump.  Important  selection  parameters  are  required  TDH,  flow  rate,  NPSHA,  fluid  and flexibility of the system. It is also important to know the fluid. Parameters like pH‐value, viscosity,  abrasives, fluid and surrounding temperature range as well as quantity, size and shape of solids. If we  know that a centrifugal pump is the right pump for the application, we can go into detail searching for  a  potential  pump  model.  Most  manufactures  provide  a  pump  selection  software,  but  there  are  also  various  manufacturer‐independent  software  packages  available  (e.g.  www.pump‐flo.com).  A  pump  selection software gives you a choice of pumps, fitting the specification made at the beginning. Many  detailed specifications can be made to characterise the application. Most pump selection software are  quite powerful tools that also provide calculators for NPSHA and TDH determination. There are also a  lot of administration tools like PDF or excel export and file management features implemented. But in  general, to select a pump it is useful to plot the curve, characterising the system and the characteristic  curve  of  a  potential  pump  into  the  same  diagram.  The  point  of  intersection  of  the  two  head  curves  indicates the operation point of the pump in the system. It is also possible to make predictions how  the pump will behave when changing system parameters. Obviously, the operation point should be as  close to the BEP as possible. A common rule when selecting a pump is to choose a pump with at least  25% more head available than required by the system. Another common practice is to choose at most  the  second  largest  impeller  diameter  available  in  a  pump  series.  This  is  reasonable  in  the  case  of  a  changing system or if there has been made a mistake during pump selection. So it is possible to change  the impeller to the next larger size without changing the casing.    

  20

 

Figure 22 – System & Pump Characteristic curve 

 

 

 

  21

  ƒ Example 1  In this example, the whole calculation for a selected application will be shown. Aim of the calculation  is to calculate the required pump parameters and to select a matching pump as well as a proper drive  unit. We assume the following equipment and hole (fig.18 1 ) properties: 

Down‐hole:  part  hole 

type 

dimension 

depth

1100m

 

Bit diameter

  tubing 

Nozzles diameter

 

length

  drilling rod 

wall thickness Type

10,16mm

 

wall thickness

8,38mm

 

outer diameter

0,169m

drilling collar 

outer diameter

8 1 2 ” (0,2159m) 

 

inner diameter

2 7 8 ” (0,07m) 

 

length

9

1

10

3

” (0,2413m) 

2

3  4

” (0,2731m)  820m

6  5 8 ” FH  

120m

Manifold:  part 

diameter [mm] 

length [m] 

main pipe  standpipe 

100 100

35  14 

mud hose 

75

17 

mud head  Kelly 

75 100

2  12 

Drilling fluid properties:  property 

value 

Type  density 

OSTWALD‐fluid  1250kg/m³ 

K­Factor  fluid index n  Figure 23 ‐ Borehole1 

0,28Ns/m²  0,64 

recommended speed   

0,63m/s   

                                                                  1  Die Bohrspülung (by Gerd‐Ulrich Lotzwick)   

  22

  First of all, it is required to calculate the flow rate, depending on the cross sections and recommended  fluid speed. Therefore it is necessary to determine the cross sections one to three and to calculate the  flow rate for the given speed by the in chapter 7 introduced formula. 

π A= (Do2 -Di2 ) 4 A1 =0,02775m 2 A 2 =0,04341m 2

 V=A 2 ⋅v

A3 =0,02924m 2

m³  V=98,478 h  

In practice, it is common to introduce a safety factor of 20% to the flow rate. 

m³  V=118,17 h   Now  we  calculate  the  pressure  losses  for  all  parts  of  the  down‐hole  assembly  as  well  as  in  the  manifold. 

Pressure losses inside the drilling rod:  v=

 V m =1,873 A s  

By calculating the modified Reynolds number, it is possible to determine the friction coefficient from  the diagram (fig.19 1 ) 

Re m =

v 2-n ⋅ D n ⋅ ρ K ⎛ ⎛ 1+3n ⎞ ⎞ 8⋅⎜ ⎟ 8 ⎜⎝ ⎝ 4n ⎠ ⎟⎠ →

Re m =5875

n

 

λ=0,027

Figure 24 – friction coefficient for OSTWALD fluids1 2

L v ⋅ ⋅ρ d 2 Δp1 =0,402MPa Δp1 =λ

 

   

 

                                                                  1  Die Bohrspülung (by Gerd‐Ulrich Lotzwick)   

  23

  Pressure losses inside the drilling collar:  The pressure losses in the inside of the drilling collar are calculated by the same way as shown above.  

Δp 2 =1,201MPa   Pressure losses between bore hole and drilling rod:  When calculating fluid flow in an annular section, it is important to use the hydraulic diameter in the  formula for the pressure loss and Reynolds number.  

D hydr =Do - Di Re M =1910

 

As  the  determined  Reynolds  number  is  smaller  than  the  critical  Reynolds  number  (3600),  we  can  assume laminar flow.  

λ=

ReM 64

λ=0,035

Δp3 =0,043MPa

 

Pressure losses between tubing and drilling rod:  After  checking  the  Reynolds  number,  the calculation can be  done  either  as  shown  above  or  like  the  first one but in both cases with the hydraulic diameter. 

Δp 4 =0,157MPa   Pressure losses in the drilling bit:  To  effectively  support  the  drilling  process  the  discharge  speed  of  the  drilling  fluid  from  the  nozzles  should not be below 105m/s. Therefore it is possible to calculate the maximum nozzles cross section  area by the law of continuity.  

 V=A Σnozzles ⋅ vdischarge



AΣnozzles =3,13cm2

 

To ensure enough fluid speed, a jet nozzle with a diameter of 7/16” (11,11mm) and a flow coefficient  α of 0,95 would be suitable. 

vdischarge =

 V

A Σnozzles

= 112,8

m s  

Now it is possible to calculate the pressure losses in the drilling bit. 

Δp 5 =

 

v discharge ⋅ ρ 2 ⋅ α2



Δp 5 =8,814MPa

 

 

  24

  Pressure losses in the manifold system:  The manifold system can be separated in to four main groups. In case of this example the type is given  and it is possible to read the pressure loss at the earlier determine flow rate from the diagram below  (fig.20 1 ). 

Δp6 =0,25MPa   The diagram is only suitable for a fluid density of  1000kg/m³ (water). So if this diagram is used to  determine  the  pressure  loss  in  the  manifold  system with the fluid in the example it has to be  corrected by the density factor. 

ρF =

ρ drilling fluid ρ water

Δp 6 =Δp×ρ F

Figure 25 – pressure loss in manifold systems1



ρ F =1, 25



Δp 6 =0,31MPa

 

Total pressure losses:  To select a pump, now all the pressure losses are summed up and 10% is added to ensure sufficient  head.   6

∑ (Δp )+10%=12,02MPa i

i=1

 

 

So for this application a pump with a flow rate of about 120m³/h and a TDH of 1202m is needed. By  entering this information into the previous mentioned pump selection software we get a number of  matching  pumps.  To  finally  decide  which  pump  fits  the  application  best  some  other  factors  like  acquisition costs, maintaining costs, energy consumption and electricity or fuel prices must be taken in  account.    

                                                                  1  Die Bohrspülung (by Gerd‐Ulrich Lotzwick)   

  25

 

 

Figure 26 – Pump selection software, criteria definition 1 

 

  1 Figure 27 – example of results provided by goulds pumps pums selection tool  

A possible selection can be saved as pdf‐file or plotted directly as shown in the example on the next page.                                                                          ITT – Goulds Pumps 

1

 

  26

   

 

 

  27

    In this case maybe a piston pump would be more suitable due to a higher efficiency at high pressures  like a centrifugal pump. Problems with the selected pumps might be its operation far off it’s BEP and  the fact that there is fairly no option to increase pressure or flow rat if necessary. Therefore centrifugal  pumps are rarely found as mud pump. But as already mentioned they can be better used to suck the  mud to a piston pump. In that application the needed TDH is much lower so this application matches  the centrifugal pumps area of application, which is low TDH and high flow rate, much better. 

ƒ Example 2 

model 

Feed Rate 

recomanded  operating  pressure 

Length  

Width  

Height  

Weight  

Header  Diameter  Inside  

Another possible  application  on a  drilling  rig  would  be  to  charge a  desander. A desander  is,  in  most  cases,  one  or  more  hydrocyclones 1 .  The  mud  enters  the  hydrocyclone tangentially into the upper cylindrical section.  The  mud  is  forced  to  move  downwards  into  the  conical  segment.  Due  to  centrifugal  force  the  heavier  solids  are  pressed against the outer wall. The inner phase of the mud  can enter the inner cylindrical part at a certain point to flow  upwards  and  discharge  at  the  top.  The  solids  leave  the  desander at its lower end. So solids down to about 80‐70µm  are removed. To ensure proper operation it is important to  guarantee the required velocity at the inlet of the desander.  It  mainly  depends  on  the  size  of  the  desander.  In  this  example  the  pump  has  to  charge  a  tri‐flo  model  1000‐2  desander unit with the properties shown below. It consists  Figure 28 ‐ Hydrocyclone, working principle1 of 2x10“ hydrocyclones seperating solids down to 70µm.   

1000­2 

1000 gpm 

25 psi

48“

80“

38“

760 lbs 

8

  The  manifold  system  recomanded  by  the  manufacturer  can  be  seen  in  fig.29 2 .  Over  all,  the  desander is charged over a 6” (~150mm) pipe with a  total length of 117” (~4m). Total hight difference is  about 2m. The properties of the mud can be seen in  the table below.       

property   

Type  density  K­Factor  fluid index n 

value  OSTWALD‐fluid 1250kg/m³ 0,28Ns/m² 0,64 

Figure 29 – recommended manifold system2

                                                                   http://glwww.mst.dk  2  Tri‐flo desander 2x10“ operating manual  1

 

  28

  First calculating the fluid speed from the required flow rate and the given cross section area. 

v=

 V m =3,6   A s

By calculating the Reynolds number it is possible to  determine the friction factor from the diagram. 

Re m =

v 2-n ⋅ D n ⋅ ρ K ⎛ ⎛ 1+3n ⎞ ⎞ 8⋅⎜ ⎟ 8 ⎜⎝ ⎝ 4n ⎠ ⎟⎠ →

Re m =14708

n

 

λ=0,015

Now the pressure losses in the suction system can be  calculated. 

L v2 ⋅ ⋅ρ   d 2 Δp1 =0,034MPa Δp1 =λ

Also the required pressure at the desander inlet and the hight difference has to be taken in account. 

Δp 2 =0,172MPa (=25psi)  required pressure at hydracyclone inlet  Δp 3 =ρ ⋅ g ⋅ h=0,25MPa   The sum equals the required TDH. In this case 20% for safety reasons are added.  3

∑ (Δp )+20%=0,842MPa   i

i=1

So we are looking for a pump with a TDH of 84m and a flow rate of 230m³/h. A possible pump would  be a Goulds Pumps – model 3700 with a 4x6‐9 impeller operated at 3560RPM. The pumps caracteristic  curve is shown in the diagram below.    

 

  29

 

   

    30

 

9) Problems at centrifugal Pumps  A  major  problem  at  centrifugal  pumps  is,  like  at  all  fast  moving  parts  in  a  fluid,  cavitation.  Other  difficulties  obtain solid handling, abrasives and corrosives as well as leakage. Most errors during pump operation can be  avoided by selecting a quality pump designed for the application and adequate maintenance. 

ƒ Cavitation  Cavitation occurs when the static pressure in a fluid is lower than  the fluids vapour pressure, mostly caused by high velocities. Due  to  Bernoulli’s  law,  static  pressure  decreases  when  velocity  is  increasing.  If  this  happens,  the  fluid  locally  starts  boiling  and  forms gas bubbles which need more space than the fluid would  take. In a centrifugal pumps’s impeller, the bubbles are moving to  an area of decreasing pressure. If the pressure now exceeds the  vapour  pressure,  the  gas  condensates  at  the  bubble’s  inner  surface  and  so  collapse  rapidly.  This  implosion  of  gas  bubbles  causes  high,  temporarily  pressure  fluctuations  of  up  to  a  few  Figure 30 – bubble collapse1 1000bar.  As  the  fluid  flows  from  higher  to  lower  pressure,  this  flow  causes  a  jet  of  the  surrounding  fluid,  which  may  hit  the  surface.  These  high  energy  micro‐jets  cause high compressive stress weakening the material. Finally, crater‐shaped deformations and holes  known  as  cavitation  pitting  (fig.23 1 )  occur.  Other  reasons  for  cavitation  can  be  a  rise  of  fluid  temperature,  a  low  pressure  at  the  suction  side  or  an  increase  of  delivery  height.  Cavitations  in  centrifugal  pumps  mainly  occur  at  the  impeller  leading  edges  (fig.24)  but  also  at  the  impeller  vane,  wear rings and thrust balance holes. To avoid cavitation, it is important to deliver sufficient NPSH and  to  keep  fluid  temperature  low.  High  fluid  temperatures  can  occur  if  the  pump  is  on  to  keep  the  pressure up but no fluid is taken out 

 

Figure 31 – regions of impeller cavitation 2 

 

The harm of cavitation to the impeller and other parts of the pump is significant.    

                                                                   www.motorlexikon.de (modified)  2  www.cheresources.com (modified)  1

 

  31

   

 

Figure 32 – typical impeller wear due to cavitation 1 

ƒ Solids and slurry handling (abrasive medias)  When  expecting  solids  in  the  fluid  or  dealing  with  slurries,  it  is  important  to  select  a  pump  that  is  designed for this application. On the other hand side, slurry pumps are much more expensive than a  standard water pump, so the decision is not that easy. As there is a very wide range of slurries it is  useful  to  divide  them  into  three  categories,  light,  medium  and  heavy  slurries  as  shown  in  the  table  below.    property 

light slurry 

medium slurry 

heavy slurry 

particle size  settling / non settling 

<200µm non settling

0,2mm – 5mm settling & non settling

>5mm settling

specific gravity 

<1,05

1,05 – 1,15

>1,15 

amount of solids 

<5%

5% ‐ 20%

20% 

  To provide a pump that can be used with slurries, special design features must be made. Slurry pumps  can be equipped with e.g. thicker wear sections, larger impellers, special material and semi‐volute or  concentric  casing.  All  these  features  extend  pump  lifespan  but  also  cause  disadvantages  like  higher  initial costs, higher weight or less efficiency. Slurry pumps can be separated into two main categories,  rubber lined and hard metal pumps. At rubber lined pumps, the inner surface is covered by a layer of  rubber,  to  absorb  solid’s  impact  energy.  Rubber  lined  pumps  have  a  limited  application  range.  This  type of wear prevention is only suitable for light at least for medium slurries at low head applications.  Also  the  fluid  temperature  should  not  exceed  150°C.  Rubber  lined  pumps  are  not  applicable  for  hydrocarbon  based  slurries.  On  the  other  hand  side,  hard  metal  pumps  are  suitable  for  high  power  applications used at even heavy slurries. Hard metal slurry pumps can also handle sharp, jagged solids  even  at  fluid  temperatures  above  150°C.  Standard  hard  metal  slurry  pumps  can  be  designed  of  hardened steel but for high corrosive fluids high alloyed steels are used. When selecting a hard metal  pump  it  is  important  that  the  pump  material  is  harder  than  the  solid  particles.  Cartable  ceramics  provide  excellent  resist  to  erosion  but  limit  impeller  tip  velocity.  The  lifespan  of  a  pump  can  be  increased by selecting the correct materials of construction. Another important factor when handling  slurries is speed. By decreasing the pumps RPM also the fluid speed is decreasing and therefore the  solid’s speed is decreasing too. This leads to lower impact energy and less wear. Experiments by pump  manufacturers  have  shown  that  a  slurry  pump’s  wear  rate  is  proportional  to  speed  raised  by  the                                                                    1  www.korros.de    

  32

  power  of  2,5.  Therefore,  by  decreasing  the  speed  of  a  slurry  pump  by  half,  this  will  lead  to  approximately  6  times  lifespan.  For  this  reason  most  slurry  pumps  are  operated  at  slowest  speed  possible equipped with impeller large in diameter to increase pump lifespan. 

ƒ corrosion  Corrosion  is  breaking  down  of  essential  properties  in  a  material  due  to  chemical  or  electrochemical  reactions  with  its  surroundings.  As  there  is  a  wide  range  of  pump  applications  within  the  chemical  industry,  including  the  petroleum  industry,  handling  oil  and  gas  up  to  high  aggressive  acids  it  is  important to provide pumps that can be operated under these difficult conditions. There are several  types of corrosion and many factors it depends on, like fluid temperature, contained elements and pH‐ value. Most common and dangerous corrosion in pumps is the so called uniform corrosion. This is the  overall attack of a corrosive liquid on a metal. The chemical reactions between fluid and metal surface  lead to uniform metal loss on the moistened surface, known as corrosive wear. To minimize corrosive  wear it is important to select a resistant pump material.  

10) Comparison centrifugal pumps vs. Piston pumps  Centrifugal and piston pumps base on two different physical principles to  cause flow. While a centrifugal pump accelerates the fluid along impeller  vanes,  a  piston  pump  causes  flow  by  the  principle  of  positive  displacement. The pressure in a piston pump is directly increased by fluid  displacement, due to a force applied on an enclosed fluid volume. At the  first step, only the inlet check valve is open and the back moving piston  sucks  fluid  from  the  suction  side.  After  a  half  rotation  of  the  cam,  the  piston  reaches  the  back  dead  centre.  Now  the  piston  starts  moving  forward and applies a force on the fluid. Therefore, the inlet check valve  closes  and  the  outlet  check  valve  opens.  The  fluid  is  pressed  into  the  piping  at  the  discharge  side.  After  the  piston  reaches  the  forward  dead  centre, fluid is sucked in again (fig.27 1 ). Obviously, a piston pump causes  Figure 33 – piston pump1 a  pulsating  flow,  what  is  the  first  major  difference.  To  reduce  these  pulsations, piston pumps are mainly designed as duplex, triplex or multiplex pumps. Most applications require  an  additional  pulsation  damper  to  reduce  pulsations  in  the  piping  system.  General  centrifugal  pumps  are  unstable  at  low  flow  rates  but  are  a  good  choice  at  medium  up  to  high  flow  rates.  Piston  pumps  could  be  manufactured for similar flow rates but would get extraordinary big and too expensive for most applications.  Centrifugal pumps are most suitable for low to medium pressure application while piston pumps are generally  used in high pressure service. Multistage centrifugal pumps can be designed for pressured up to 400bar but are  most efficient at high flow rates. Piston pumps on the other hand are generally a better choice for applications  exceeding 200bar at low to medium flow rates. A piston pump is continuously increasing the pressure, while  working  against  an  enclosed  fluid  volume.  Therefore,  a  relief  valve  is  needed  to  prevent  pump  and  piping  system of overpressure. Centrifugal pumps cannot increase pressure upon the pumps typical shut‐off pressure  on the pump characteristic curve. The shut‐off pressure is always lower than the pump’s design pressure and in  a well designed application also lower than the piping systems maximum pressure. So when using a centrifugal  pump, no relief valve is needed. An exception is to prevent the pump of damage due to temperature rise at low  flow  rates  or  shut  down  the  pump  and  ensure  a  minimum  flow  to  keep  it  stable.  As  a  centrifugal  pump  operates on a various‐flow, various‐head curve, the flow rate increases if the discharge pressure is reduced. A  piston  pump  always  delivers  a  constant  flow  rate  at  a  given  speed,  independent  of  discharge  pressure.                                                                     www.lcresources.com (modified) 

1

 

  33

  Generally, centrifugal pumps, apart from special designs of some manufactures, are not self priming. So most  applications  require  an  external  priming  source.  In  application  where  both,  a  centrifugal  pump  as  well  as  a  piston  pump,  may  be  suitable  another  factor  is  required  space  and  costs.  A  centrifugal  pump  is  in  general  cheaper in acquisition and maintenance and requires less space than a comparable piston pump. On the other  hand  side,  a  piston  pump  requires  less  power.  Of  course  this  is  only  a  general  guideline.  A  pump  operated  outside of its optimum operating parameters can turn this around by causing e.g. higher maintenance costs.  Therefore a pump should be carefully selected to avoid extra costs. So it is important to know that centrifugal  pumps are suitable for handling clear, non abrasive fluids up to abrasive fluids with a high amount of solids, but  do not work well with high viscous fluids because efficiency would drop dramatically. There would also appear  problems when handling fluids combined with gasses due to the required close clearances. Piston pumps also  work well for clean, clear non abrasive fluids up to abrasive slurries. Due to the relatively low fluid velocities,  piston pumps are unsusceptible to erosions and wear.     

Centrifugal pump 

optimum  flow  and  pressure  medium/high capacity application  low/medium pressure 

 

 

Piston pump  low/medium capacity  medium/high pressure 

maximum flow rate 

50000m³/h +

3000m³/h + 

low flow capability  maximum pressure 

no  400bar+

yes 7000bar+

requires relief valve  smooth or pulsating flow 

no  smooth

yes pulsating

self priming 

no 

yes

variable or constant flow  space conditions 

variable requires less space

constant requires more space 

fluid handling 

Suitable for a wide range including  clean, clear, non‐abrasive fluids to  fluids  with  abrasive,  high‐solid  content. 

Suitable  for  clean,  clear,  non‐ abrasive  fluids.   Specially‐fitted  pumps  suitable  for  abrasive‐slurry  service. 

fluid viscosity 

Not  suitable  for  high  viscosity  Suitable for high viscosity fluids fluids 

gases 

Lower  tolerance  for  entrained  Higher  tolerance  for  entrained  gases  gases 

costs 

lower initial lower maintenance  higher power 

higher initial  higher maintenance  lower power 

 

  34

 

11) Standards 1  There  are  different  organisations  dealing  with  standardisation.  Also  some  standards  in  pump  design  are  available. Standards of design and dimensional specifications are necessary to bring unity to centrifugal pumps.  Standards are provided by organizations like  • ISO ‐ International Standards Organizations  • API ‐ American International Institute  • ANSI ‐ American National Standards Institute  •

DIN ‐ Deutsches Institut für Normung 

• •

NPFA ‐ National Fire Protection Agency  BSi ‐ British Standards institute 

  Some commonly used centrifugal pumps standards   

ANSI/API 610‐1995 ‐ Centrifugal Pumps for General Refinery Service ‐ Covers the minimum requirements for  centrifugal  pumps,  including  pumps  running  in  reverse  as  hydraulic  power  recovery  turbines,  for  use  in  petroleum, heavy duty chemicals, and gas industry services. The pump types covered by this standard can be  broadly classified as overhung, between bearings, and vertically suspended.     DIN EN ISO 5199 ‐ Technical specifications for centrifugal pumps     ASME  B73.1‐2001  ‐  Specification  for  Horizontal  End  Suction  Centrifugal  Pumps  for  Chemical  Process  ‐  This  standard  covers  centrifugal  pumps  of  horizontal,  end  suction  single  stage,  centreline  discharge  design.  This  standard  includes  dimensional  interchange  ability  requirements  and  certain  design  features  to  facilitate  installation  and  maintenance.  It  is  the  intent  of  this  standard  that  pumps  of  the  same  standard  dimension  designation from all sources of supply shall be interchangeable with respect to mounting dimensions, size and  location of suction and discharge nozzles, input shafts, base plates, and foundation bolt holes    ASME B73.2‐2003 ‐ Specifications for Vertical In‐Line Centrifugal Pumps for Chemical Process     BS 5257:1975 ‐ Specification for horizontal end‐suction centrifugal pumps (16 bar) ‐ Principal dimensions and  nominal duty point. Dimensions for seal cavities and base plate installations.  

12) Conclusion  Due to the wide range of applications and millions of sold pumps, nowadays centrifugal pumps are technically  mature  machines.  Reasons  for  high  efficiencies  are  a  lot  of  experience  as  well  as  modern  finite  element  optimisation.  These  flow  optimisation  procedures  are  standard  engineering  methods  and  lead  to  well  constructed casings and impellers. This leads to many different special designs, constructed for a specific range  of applications. Equipped with well selected anti wear systems and materials in combination with reasonable  maintenance, a long lifespan can be met.     

                                                                  1  www.engineeringtoolbox.com   

  35

 

13) References  Internet sources:  ITT – Goulds Pumps 

http://www.gouldspumps.com 

Light my Pump 

http://www.lightmypump.com/pump_glossary.htm 

Mc Nally Institute 

http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com 

Yokota Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 

http://www.aquadevice.com 

The engineering tool box 

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com 

 

Literature:  Radial‐ und Axialpumpen (by A.J. Stephanoff)  Fundamentals and Applications of Centrifugal pumps (by Alfred Benaroya)  Die Bohrspülung (by Gerd‐Ulrich Lotzwick)  Reinhütte Pumpen – Centrifugal pumps, technical design (by Stephan Näckel)  Lawrence Pumps – Run Times, sept.04, jan.05 & oct.05 issue (by Dale B. Andrews)  World Pumps, sept.07 issue (by Joseph R. Askew)  Pump User’s Handbook (by Heinz P. Bloch, Allan R. Budris)   

Figure sources are mentioned at the end of each page     

Contact:  Christian Allerstorfer  Roseggerstraße 10/6  8700 Leoben    Supervised by  Univ.‐Prof. Dipl.‐Ing. Dr.mont. Kessler Franz  Dep. of design and conveying technology  MU Leoben 

 

  36

Loading...

Centrifugal Pumps

                  Bachelor Thesis  Centrifugal Pumps                                                      by  Christian Allerstorfer    Supervised ...

4MB Sizes 4 Downloads 5 Views

Recommend Documents

Centrifugal pumps
The total energy of the fluid remains unchanged if there is no inlet or outlet power. When fluid is in motion, the part

Selecting Centrifugal Pumps
Developed Head and Developed Pressure of the Pump ............. 0 . . Efficiency and Input ..... Calculation Examples. (

Vertical multi-stage centrifugal pumps - DP-Pumps
Operation. The rotating impeller causes the pressure at the inlet of the impeller to drop. This decrease in pressure cre

Centrifugal water pumps pdf
... deterges the formula frying and centrifugal water pumps pdf tactical training schools in florida phosphorised theore

Centrifugal Pumps - Rimbach Publishing Inc
Oct 17, 2007 - 317/293-2930. 6500. Environmental Treatment Systems. 15-30. 2 1/2/250. •. •. 770/384-0602. Fairbanks

Bearings in centrifugal pumps - SKF.com
shape and size of the impeller, using an index number called specific speed, ns, see figure 1.4. The specific speed numb

Fluid Viscosity Effects on Centrifugal Pumps - Warren Pumps
head-capacity curves presented in pump vendor catalogs are pre- ... tional horsepower required to overcome this drag red

Engineering Page > Pumps > Information Centrifugal Pump Calculation
Nov 21, 2017 - (Using a double suction pump provides two impeller eyes and is in fact based on this principle). There is

Chapter 9 CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS - Springer Link
of this type as prime movers for high-tonnage slurry operations was shown ... (Power ).^ = 2mT = 2nlS!T/60. (9.4). With

missiontm centrifugal pumps - Continental Supply Company
8x6x14. 8. 8 Holes 7/8 D-11 3/4 B.C. 6. 8 Holes 7/8 D-9 1/2 B.C. 22 1/2D 5 5/16 1 26 3/4. 21. 14. 14. 8 3/8. Assembled u